Nationalist reflex against internationalist cultural evolution…

Orhan Pamuk

One of the recent discussion themes of intellectual circles in Istanbul, was the interview given by Orhan Pamuk to the newspaper Tagesanzeiger in Switzerland last month…

Pamuk’s abrupt but volitive invitation to read and discuss the paradigms of a historic taboo with a different point of view, has triggered a loathing and grudge campaign against himself: Apparently, Orhan Pamuk, a worldwide famous and respectable Turkish novelist, has almost been ostracized in his own country, as if he were an ill-intentioned fellow who testifies against the suspected felony of another fellow! This is a pure symptom of the ambivalence of our social memory…

So, if you prefer to emphasize the conspiracy stories and the learned-by-heart discourses of status quo, instead of skeptically facing the historical causality of the politics, then your “reality” is supposed to be derived from only what you perceive and feel at the very moment!

In fact, what matters is the level of your tolerance to the free expression of different thoughts, even if it abruptly dares to criticize the intrinsic nationalist values and social prejudices…

I think, Orhan Pamuk is a volitive novelist who endeavors to literarily define transitional and interactive dynamics of the dialectic coexistence of Turkish culture between the Orient and the West… Just like his literary predecessors Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar and Oguz Atay did years ago…

It is no secret that a “nationalist reflex against cultural globalisation” is implicitly strong among some certain intellectuals with a vintage fear of imperialism… Well, neither fear nor hatred sounds reasonable in the modern times of an extremely dialectic and internationalist struggle against injustices and inequalities created by “neo-con” politics of global capitalism! (just remember the coexistence and the interaction atmosphere of the social forum in Porto Allegre…)

1 Comment so far

  1. Guest (unregistered) on December 14th, 2005 @ 11:44 pm

    General information about Turkish culture and more about Turkey



Terms of use | Privacy Policy | Content: Creative Commons | Site and Design © 2009 | Metroblogging ® and Metblogs ® are registered trademarks of Bode Media, Inc.